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St Michael's C of E VA Primary School

‘Life in all its Fullness’

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Supporting your family's wellbeing

We all need to take care of our own health and wellbeing whilst we are at home. Take a look at the links and suggested activities your families can use.

Schools and Families Advice Line

(SFAL)

The ‘Schools and Families Advice Line’ (SFAL) is a new service established to provide emotional wellbeing advice and early help to children and young people, school staff and families during the COVID-19 pandemic.

It can be really worrying when you, or someone you know is going through a difficult time. If you feel this service could help, please call our Single Point of Access (SPA) who will take your details before passing them onto our call back service.

Contact Details:

Telephone: 0300 777 0707

Email: hpft.spa@nhs.net

You will get a call back from a mental health practitioner between 8am-5pm, Monday-Friday

 

How can the service help?

Supporting children, young people and their families by providing early advice around managing:

  • Specific anxieties (around COVID-19/self-isolating measures, transition between year groups, developing and maintaining relationships, fear of failure, low self-esteem or aspirations, trust issues, social anxiety, etc.)
  • Phobias (animals/insects, specific food stuffs, specific objects, modes of transport etc.)
  • Low mood
  • Emotional regulation difficulties.
  • Mild obsessive compulsive difficulties that are starting to impact day to day activities.

 

School Nursing Service

  • There is a School Nurse on duty every weekday that can support you with any concerns you may have about a child’s/children’s health and wellbeing. They can be contacted on:

0300 123 7572 from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday

  • The service is continuing to accept referrals for children and young people requiring support for low level mental health, emotional and wellbeing concerns including anxiety, low mood, anger, behaviour, self-esteem, stress and sleep issues.

Referrals can be made online through the following link:

                https://www.hct.nhs.uk/forms/school-nursing-form.asp

  • Chathealth texting service - 07480 635050
This service is available for young people aged 11 to 19. Texts are responded to by a School Nurse between 9am and 5pm Monday to Friday.

 

NHS Mental Health services

A CAMHS specialist is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to provide specialist advice and support to families and professionals about children/young people in a mental health crisis and (if necessary) arrange for a face to face assessment.

This service is available through our Single Point of Access line on 0300 777 0707 or

email: hpft.spa@nhs.net   (for non-urgent enquiries).

When you become concerned that a young person may be experiencing a mental health crisis we would ask that your school advise the family/young person to call this number in the first instance, unless they are in a medical/physical emergency  in which case  they will need to attend A&E.

 

Coronavirus: Supporting children’s wellbeing

Suggested links and websites:

NSPCC Helpline

Whether you want support and advice for adapting to family life in lockdown, or you’re worried about a child, the NSPCC are here to help.

Whatever your worry – call the NSPCC on 0808 800 5000, email, or submit the online form – they can help. They also have advice about spotting the signs of abuse. You can call Monday to Friday 8am – 10pm or 9am – 6pm at the weekends. It’s free and you don’t have to say who you are.

Safer Places Domestic Abuse Services

As per Government and Public Health England advice for Coronavirus (COVID-19), Safer Places are still operating and will continue to provide services and support to victims of Domestic Abuse who need our services whilst taking the necessary precautions.

Our emergency line will remain open 24/7 please call 03301 025 811 for more information about how to access our services.

Bereavement

5 Ways to Wellbeing

Be Active

Make time for exercise and breaks throughout the day.

  • Start each morning with a PE lesson at 9am with Joe Wicks
  • If you have a garden, use it regularly. If you don’t, try to get out once a day as permitted by the government (households can be together outdoors but 2 metres apart from others)
  • Watch a dance video from Go Noodle to get the heart-rate going
  • Try a dance routine for the whole family with Oti Mabuse from Strictly Come Dancing

Connect

 

  • Get your children to write postcards to their grandparents or to pen pals
  • Ask grandparents to listen to your children read on FaceTime (or ask grandparents to read to younger children)

Give

 

  • Share the chores to do so your children feel more responsible about the daily routine at home
  • Ask them to help you cook and bake 

Take notice

 

  • Use your senses to take notice e.g.:
    • Listen. Can you hear the birds getting louder as the days are getting longer.
    • Smell. Appreciate the aroma of freshly baked biscuits.
    • Touch. How many different textures can you feel in your living room.
    • See. Look out of your window. What can you see.
    • Taste. Eat a different types of fruit and take time to notice they taste. Are they sweet or sour?
  • Take time out of the day to reflect. Try these meditation and mindfulness linkshttps://www.smilingmind.com.au/ or https://www.headspace.com/headspace-meditation-app
  • Accept that the children will probably watch more TV/spend time on their phone – that's ok but you might want to set/agree some screen time limits

Keep Learning

  • Why don't you take up a new hobby. May be learn how to knit, how to sew, how to draw or how to bake.

 

Keep to a timetable wherever possible

  • Create and stick to a routine if you can. This is what children are used to. For example, eat breakfast at the same time and make sure they're dressed before starting the ‘school’ day – avoid staying in pyjamas!
  • Involve your children in setting the timetable where possible. It’s a great opportunity for them to manage their own time better and it’ll give them ownership
  • Check in with your children and try to keep to the timetable, but be flexible. If a task/activity is going well or they want more time, let it extend where possible
  • If you have more than 1 child at home, consider combining their timetables. For example, they might exercise and do maths together – see what works for your household
  • Designate a working space if possible, and at the end of the day have a clear cut-off to signal school time is over
  • Stick the timetable up on the wall so everyone knows what they should be doing when, and tick activities off throughout the day
  • Distinguish between weekdays and weekends, to separate school life and home life

 

See the class pages and the home learning page for recommendations.

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